Browsing All posts tagged under »immigrant literature«

Book review: The Man Who Never Stopped Sleeping by Aharon Appelfeld

February 9, 2017

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“With its universal themes of healing, recovery, creativity, and finding one’s vocation The Man Who Never Stopped Sleeping should engage the wide readership Appelfeld’s prose deserves. Readers may want to buy extra copies and donate them to VA hospitals.” — from my review in New York Journal of Books. Advertisements

Jewish books: Fishman and Tsabari explore home and displacement in new fiction

March 25, 2016

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In my examiner article (next paragraph) I write: “Two fiction books published this month explore what home means for two distinct waves of recent immigrants. Boris Fishman continues to relate the experiences of Russian speaking Jews who immigrated to America in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s in his second novel Don’t Let My Baby Do Rodeo, […]

Book review: A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman

June 7, 2014

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Slava Gelman, the protagonist of Boris Fishman‘s debut novel A Replacement Life, fabricates Holocaust narratives for elderly Russian immigrants’ reparations claims applications. In my NYJB review I write, “Slava knows that to make his stories convincing he has to get the details right, and despite the leaps of faith Fishman demands he provides more than […]

Poems by Irina Mashinski. An Attempt to Explain. ‘Cardinal Points’ literary journal

May 28, 2011

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“…I walk through the tall grass of Russian syllables, where colons and commas are abundant in June, and syntax is vague on ladybugs’ wings…”   Poems by Russian-American poet Irina Mashinski on stosvet.net  

Vaclav and Lena, a novel about Russian-Jewish immigrants in Brooklyn – New York NY

May 17, 2011

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Today New York publisher The Dial Press, a division of Random House, releases Haley Tanner‘s debut novel Vaclav and Lena, a coming of age tale about Russian-Jewish immigrant children in Brooklyn. In my New York Journal of Books review I describe the book as “a tale of unconditional love; of attachment, separation, and reunion; and […]

Book Review: The Cosmopolitans by Nadia Kalman — New York Journal of Books

December 9, 2010

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“The Cosmopolitans, Nadia Kalman’s smart, funny, wise, and entertaining debut novel explores the relationships and dynamics of a contemporary Russian-Jewish immigrant family from the former Soviet Union, their acculturation in Stamford, CT, as well as the love lives and courtships of the three daughters.” Read the entire review on New York Journal of Books.